Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics

 

The Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics was created in 2015. The goal of the Center is to promote research in the broadly defined area of Macroeconomics that seeks to better understand the forces that shape macroeconomic outcomes and the potential for policy to influence these outcomes.

The Center supports a broad range of activities in support of this goal, including post-doctoral fellowships, visiting faculty, seminars, conferences, and research support for students and faculty.

The Center was made possible by a very generous gift from Louis A. Simpson.

 

Contacts

Richard Rogerson
Director, Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics

Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Office: 292 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building
Email: rdr@princeton.edu

Jennifer Bello
Administrator, Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics

Office: 273 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building
Email: jmbello@princeton.edu
Phone: 609-258-8049

Upcoming Seminars

  
  

News

2017 Simpson Lecture

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The 2017 Simpson Lecture featured Robert E. (Bob) Hall, the Robert and Carole McNeil Joint Hoover Senior Fellow and Professor of Economics at Stanford University. Hall’s lecture, titled "The Pervasive Importance of Labor-Market Tightness in Macroeconomic Volatility" was part of an event which joined the annual Simpson Lecture with the dedication of the Louis A. Simpson International Building. You can find more information on the dedication here.

2016 Simpson Lecture

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The Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics held its 2016 annual Simpson Lecture on Monday, October 24, 2016, and it featured Nobel Laureate Robert E. Lucas, Jr.  Lucas is the John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in Economics at the University of Chicago and is widely regarded as the central figure in the new classical approach to macroeconomics. He won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1995 for developing and applying the theory of rational expectations. The title of his lecture for the 2016 Simpson Lecture was “What Was the Industrial Revolution.”

2015 Simpson Lecture

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Photos by Kevin Birch of T. Kevin Birch Photography

$10 million from alumnus establishes Louis A. Simpson Center for the Study of Macroeconomics at Princeton

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People

Director
Director

Richard Rogerson

Richard Rogerson joined the faculty of Princeton University in spring of 2011, where he is the Charles and Marie Robertson Professor of Public and International Affairs. He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota in 1984 and has previously held faculty positions at the University of Rochester, New York University, Stanford University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Pennsylvania, and Arizona State University. His teaching and research interests are in the fields of Macroeconomics and Labor Economics. His published work includes papers on labor supply and taxes, business cycle fluctuations, the effects of labor market regulations, financing of public education, and development. He currently serves as Editor of the American Economic Journal: Macro and Associate Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics, and has previously served as Co-Editor of the American Economic Review and Associate Editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and the International Economic Review. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a fellow of the Econometric Society.

Education:Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Title:Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Email:rdr@princeton.edu

Office:292 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Executive Committee

Mark A. Aguiar

Mark Aguiar is the Walker Professor of Economics and International Finance at Princeton University, as well as a co-editor for American Economic Review. Before teaching at Princeton, he was a professor of economics at The University of Rochester, and a visiting assistant professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Indian School of Business, and the University of Chicago. He is a three-time winner of the Truman Scholarship.

Aguiar received his bachelor’s from Brown University and his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mark Aguiar studies macroeconomics and international economics. His recent publications have addressed the macroeconomics of time allocation, fiscal policy in debt constrained economics, and quantitative models of sovereign debt crises.

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Professor of Economics

Email:maguiar@princeton.edu

Office:190 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Atif Mian

Atif Mian is John H. Laporte, Jr. Class of 1967 Professor of Economics, Public Policy and Finance at Princeton University, and Director of the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance at the Woodrow Wilson School. He holds a bachelors degree in Mathematics with Computer Science and Ph.D. in Economics from MIT. Prior to joining Princeton in 2012 he taught at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Chicago Booth School of business. Professor Mian’s work studies the connections between finance and the macro economy. His latest book, House of Debt, with Amir Sufi builds upon powerful new data to describe how debt precipitated the Great Recession. The book explains why debt continues to threaten the global economy, and what needs to be done to fix the financial system. House of Debt is critically acclaimed by The New York Times, Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal,The Economist, and The Atlantic among others. Professor Mian’s research has appeared in top academic journals, including the American Economic ReviewEconometrica, Quarterly Journal of EconomicsJournal of FinanceReview of Financial Studies and Journal of Financial Economics.

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Research Interests:Financial Intermediation, Political Economy

Email:atif@princeton.edu

Office:208 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Esteban Rossi-Hansberg

Education:Ph.D., University of Chicago

Title:Ph.D., University of Chicago

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, International and Urban Economics

Email:erossi@princeton.edu

Office:289 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Christopher A. Sims

Christopher Albert Sims is an American econometrician and macroeconomist. He is currently the John J.F. Sherrerd ’52 University Professor of Economics at Princeton University. Together with Thomas Sargent, he won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics Sciences in 2011. The award cited their “empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy”.

Education:Ph.D., Harvard University

Title:Professor of Economics and Banking

Research Interests:Econometrics, Macroeconomics

Email:sims@princeton.edu

Office:209 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Associated Faculty

Roland Bénabou

Roland Bénabou joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1999 and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Bénabou’s research spans both macroeconomic and microeconomic areas, such as the interplay of inflation and imperfect competition, or speculation and manipulation in financial markets. His recent work lies in three main areas. The first links inequality, growth, social mobility and the political economy of redistribution. The second centers on education, social interactions and the socioeconomic structure of cities. The third is that of economics and psychology (“behavioral economics”). It focuses in particular on extrinsic incentives versus intrinsic motivation, on the determinants of prosocial behavior and on motivated beliefs, both individual (overconfidence, wishful thinking, identity) and collective (groupthink, market manias, ideology, religion).

Bénabou is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the Econometric Society, Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research, Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Research Fellow of the Institute for the Study of Labor, Senior Fellow of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, and a member of the Behavioral Economics Roundtable. He has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and a Guggenheim Fellow. He is currently a coeditor of the American Economic Review and serves or has served on the editorial board of numerous other journals such as the Review of Economic Studies, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Economic Growth and the Journal of the European Economic Association. Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Research Interests:Macroeconomics Theory, Microeconomic Theory

Email:rbenabou@princeton.edu

Office:286 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Alan S. Blinder

Alan S. Blinder has been on the Princeton faculty since 1971, taking time off from January 1993 through January 1996 for service in the U.S. government–first as a member of President Clinton’s original Council of Economic Advisers, and then as Vice Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. In addition to his academic writings [booksacademic articles] and his best-selling introductory textbook, he has written many newspaper and magazine columns and op-eds and, in recent years, has been a regular columnist for The Wall Street Journal. He also appears frequently on television on PBS, CNBC, CNN, Bloomberg, and others. Dr. Blinder is a Distinguished Fellow and past vice president of the American Economic Association, a past president of the Eastern Economic Association, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Monetary Policy Economics

Email:blinder@princeton.edu

Office:284 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Markus Brunnermeier

Markus K. Brunnermeier is the Edwards S. Sanford Professor at Princeton University. He is a faculty member of the Department of Economics and director of Princeton’s Bendheim Center for Finance. He is also a research associate at NBER, CEPR, and CESifo and a member of the Bellagio Group on the International Economy. He is a Sloan Research Fellow, Fellow of the Econometric Society, Guggenheim Fellow  and the recipient of the Bernácer Prize granted for outstanding contributions in the fields of macroeconomics and finance. He is/was a member of several advisory groups, including to the IMF, the Federal Reserve of New York, the European Systemic Risk Board, the Bundesbank and the U.S. Congressional Budget Office. Brunnermeier was awarded his Ph.D. by the London School of Economics (LSE).

His research focuses on international financial markets and the macroeconomy with special emphasis on bubbles, liquidity, financial and monetary price stability. To explore these topics, his models incorporate frictions as well as behavioral elements. He has been awarded  several best paper prizes and served on the editorial boards of several leading economics and finance journals. He has tried to establish the concepts: liquidity spirals, CoVaR as co-risk measure, the Volatility Paradox, Paradox of Prudence, ESBies, financial dominance and the redistributive monetary policy. His recent book is titled “The Euro and the Battle of Ideas”.

Education:Ph.D., London School of Economics and Political Science

Title:Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Financial Economics

Email:markus@princeton.edu

Office:305 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Gene M. Grossman

Gene M. Grossman is the Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics in the Department of Economics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.  Professor Grossman received his B.A. from Yale University and his Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and joined the Princeton faculty immediately thereafter in 1980. He has served as Director of Princeton’s International Economics Section since 1999 and completed his second term as Chair of Princeton’s economics department in 2014.

Professor Grossman has received numerous professional honors and awards including the Onassis Prize in International Trade from the Onassis Foundation, the Cass Business School and the City of London, the Harry G. Johnson Prize from the Canadian Economics Association, the Bernard-Harms Prize from the Kiel Institute for the World Economy and fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.  He was elected a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 1992, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1997, and a Life Member of the Council on Foreign Relations in 2008, and he holds Honorary Doctorates from the University of St. Gallen and the University of Minho.  Professor Grossman served a three-year term on the Executive Committee of the American Economic Association.  He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and of the Center for Economic Policy Research, and serves on the editorial boards ofthe Journal of Economic Growth, the Review of International Economics, the German Economic Review, and several other professional journals.

Professor Grossman has written extensively on international trade.  He is well known for his work on the relationship between trade and growth, and in particular for his book with Elhanan Helpman entitled Innovation and Growth in the Global Economy.  He has also written (with colleague Alan Krueger) a pair of widely-cited papers on the likely environmental impacts of the North American Free Trade Agreement and on the relationship between economic growth and the environment, which initiated a voluminous literature on the so-called “Environmental Kuznets Curve.”  Another branch of Professor Grossman’s research focuses on the political forces that shape modern trade policy.  He and Elhanan Helpman collaborated on “Protection for Sale” and on two books, Special Interest Politics and Interest Groups and Trade Policy, published by the MIT Press and Princeton University Press, respectively.  With colleague Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, he wrote “Trade in Tasks: A Simple Theory of Offshoring,” which explores the wage effects of the globalization of production. Professor Grossman’s most recent research focuses on the effects of trade and growth on the wage distribution.

Professor Grossman is married to Jean Baldwin Grossman, a Senior Fellow at MDRC and a Lecturer in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.  The Grossmans are very proud of their two daughters, Shari (an M.D.-Ph.D. student at the Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute) and Dina (an Associate at Analysis Group in Washington DC).

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Professor of International Economics and International Affairs

Research Interests:International Economics

Email:grossman@princeton.edu

Office:290 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Oleg Itskhoki

Oleg Itskhoki is a professor in the Department of Economics and at the Woodrow Wilson School. His research interests are in the fields of Macroeconomics and International Economics. One line of his research focuses on the effects of globalization on labor markets, in particular unemployment and income inequality. Another line of his research studies the pricing policies of firms in international transaction, in particular focusing on currency choice by importing and exporting firms and its implication for macroeconomic policies. He also explores the role of large firms in international transmission of shocks. His most recent research is centered around the issue of optimal macroeconomic policies in currency unions and optimal development and industrial policies in economies with financial frictions. He was a participant in the Review of Economic Studies tour, a Sloan Research Fellow and is a recepeint of the Excellence Award in Global Economic Affairs from the Kiel Institute for the World Economy. His research was supported by a National Science Foundation grant and his work is published in American Economic ReviewEconometricaQuarterly Journal of Economics, and Review of Economic Studies.

Education:Ph.D., Harvard University

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs

Research Interests:Macroeconomics and International Economics

Email:itskhoki@princeton.edu

Office:193 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Gregor Jarosch

Gregor Jarosch is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Princeton University. His research interests include macro, labor, and search. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago.

Education:Ph.D., University of Chicago

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Labor, Search

Email:gjarosch@princeton.edu

Office:195 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki

Nobuhiro Kiyotaki is a Japanese economist and professor at Princeton University especially known for proposing several models that provide deeper microeconomic foundations for macroeconomics, some of which play a prominent role in New Keynesian macroeconomics.

Education:Ph.D., Harvard University

Title:Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomic Theory

Email:kiyotaki@princeton.edu

Office:189 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Benjamin Moll

Benjamin Moll is an Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs: Cyril E. Black University Preceptor at Princeton University. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago.  His research interests include macroeconomics and development economics.

Education:Ph.D., University of Chicago

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Development Economics

Email:moll@princeton.edu

Office:192 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Stephen Morris

Stephen Morris is the Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics at Princeton University.  He is a faculty member of the Department of Economics, the founding and current director of the William S. Dietrich Economic Theory Center and an affiliate of the Bendheim Center of Finance and the Research Program in Political Economy.  Morris received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1991 and was previously a faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania and Yale University.

His research focuses foundations and applications of game theory and mechanism design, and in particular the role of incomplete information.  Applications include finance, auctions, macroeconomics and political economy.

He is a former Sloan Research Fellow, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He served as editor of Econometrica from 2007-2011 and is currently the first Vice-President of Econometric Society.

Education:Ph.D., Yale University

Title:Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Microeconomics

Email:smorris@princeton.edu

Office:394 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Ezra Oberfield

Ezra Oberfield is an Assistant Professor of Economics:  John Maclean, Jr., Presidential University Preceptor at Princeton University. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago. His research interests lie in the areas of macroeconomics, firm dynamics, and growth.

Education:Ph.D., University of Chicago

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomics

Email:edo@princeton.edu

Office:292A Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Stephen Redding

Stephen Redding is an American economist, focusing in international trade and economic geography and productivity and economic growth, currently the Harold T. Shapiro *64 Professor in Economics at Princeton University.

Education:Ph.D., University of Oxford

Title:Harold T. Shapiro*64 Professor in Economics

Research Interests:International trade and economic geography, Productivity and economic growth

Email:reddings@princeton.edu

Office:293 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Gianluca Violante

Gianluca Violante has published his research in the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Review of Economic Studies. He has also published in several top-field journals.

After his Laurea from the Universita’ di Torino, Gianluca received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997. Before joining NYU in 2002, he was first a Lecturer and then a Reader (U.K. equivalent of Assistant Professor and of tenured Associate Professor, respectively) at University College London.

He is a Research Associate of the NBER (EFG program), a Research Fellow of the CEPR (LE, MEF, and MG programs) and IZA, and an International Fellow of the IFS.

Since 2016, he is a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

From January 2009 to July 2013, he was the Coordinating Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics. He is currently one of the Co-Editors of Econometrica.

Gianluca was among the invited semi-plenary speakers at the 2010 World Congress of the Econometric Society in Shanghai and at the 2016 North American Summer Meetings of the Econometric Society in Philadelphia. He was one of the plenary speakers at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the SED in Seoul, and at the Fall 2015 Midwest Macro Meeting in Rochester. In March 2016, he gave the Berglas Lecture at Tel Aviv University.

Education:Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Title:Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Labor Economics, Public Finance

Email:glv2@princeton.edu

Office:191 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Mark W. Watson

Watson’s research focuses on time-series econometrics, empirical macroeconomics, and macroeconomic forecasting. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Econometric Society. Before coming to Princeton in 1995, Watson served on the economics faculty at Harvard and Northwestern. Watson did his undergraduate work at Pierce Junior College and California State University at Northridge, and completed his Ph.D. at the University of California at San Diego.

Education:Ph.D., UC, San Diego

Title:Professor of Economics and Public Affairs

Research Interests:Econometrics

Email:mwatson@princeton.edu

Office:194 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Arlene Wong

Arlene Wong is an assistant professor at Princeton University and a faculty research fellow of the NBER.

Her research focuses on macroeconomics, monetary economics, and household consumption.

Education:Ph.D., Northwestern University

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Monetary Economics, Finance, Real Estate

Email:aw32@princeton.edu

Office:192a Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

Juan Pablo Xandri

Juan Pablo Xandri is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Princeton University. He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Education:Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Title:Assistant Professor of Economics

Research Interests:Macroeconomics, Microeconomic Theory

Email:jxandri@princeton.edu

Office:395 Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building

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